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Deer and Doe Myosotis Dresses

Deer and Doe Myosotis Dresses

This is the third pattern from Deer and Doe patterns I have fallen in love with. I don’t say that lightly because in books when I make a pattern more than once, it only means that I really love it. And the Deer and Doe Myosotis dress was not any different I have sewed it up twice already with some few hacks here and there. I love both dresses I have made so far and I am not yet done with this pattern.

Pattern Description:

The Deer and Doe Myosotis dress pattern is an oversize shirt dress with inseam pockets. It comes in two versions; version A has sleeve ruffles and a tiered skirt and version B has plain sleeves and a gathered skirt.

Pattern Sizing:

This pattern comes in 10 sizes ranging from size 34 to 46 for Printed patterns and size 34 to 52 for PDF ones. I sewed up size 36 throughout.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, it did look like the pattern envelope if I am not considering some alterations I made to the pattern.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Oh yes, I can’t fault the Does and Doe instructions. They are well-written and hold your hand through out the construction process.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

The pattern is drafted to be quite short that I added two inches to the Version B dress to get to above my knees.

Fabric Used:

For this version B dress I made it out of Dashwood studio cotton poplin fabric which was given to me by Sew by the Sea Margate (a fabric store in Margate with an online store too).

For the second one, I hacked version A into a midi dress and I used a Lady McElroy cotton lawn fabric which I received from Minerva in exchange for a blog post.

Here is the link to the detailed blog post about the making of this dress I posted on the Minerva site.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

  • I lengthened both bodice pieces by an inch which end up landing at my natural waistline.
  • I added ties to both dresses to cinch in the waist because the dress is meant to be loose around the waist.

I lengthened the version B this skirt piece by 2 inches to give it the length i was happy with.

For this version, the hacked midi dress, I used the lengthened Version B skirt to which I added the ruffle pattern piece which comes with the version A

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Of course yes. I would recommend this dress to a confident beginner who is comfortable with sewing buttonholes.

Conclusion:

I love both these dresses and I am also happy that i hacked the pattern to create a midi dress version. I will be revisiting this pattern again sooner than later. Thank you for stopping by.

Four Prisma Dresses by Love Notions

Four Prisma Dresses by Love Notions

I have in the past not sewed up a single pattern more than twice because there are so many patterns to try. This changed when I first sewed up the Love Notions Prisma dress which has become my tried and tested little girls dress pattern. It offers many mix and match options while being a great scrap busting project too. It can be made up as either a casual or dressed up dress depending on the fabrics used.

Here are more of my Love Notions sewing pattern reviews

I am both a pattern tester and an ambassador with Love Notions patterns. This means that any purchases you make using the Love Notions patterns links I share on here earn me a small commission which goes to support this website. However, this comes at no extra cost to you and you are under no obligation to use them.

Prisma Dress Sewing Pattern

Pattern Features

  • Girls size 2T – 16
  • Three neckline options: scoop, Peter Pan collar and button boatneck
  • Three sleeve lengths: short, elbow and long
  • A-line, drop-waisted flare of pleated skirt
  • Two-pocket styles
  • Recommended for a confident beginner

The Fabric

This pattern is recommended for Knit fabrics such as cotton jersey, rayon jersey, Ponte, ITY, Liverpool and Scuba. However, if you are sewing the pleated skirt, a more stable knit is recommended.

The Making

I sewed up four dresses for my daughter using the Prisma Sewing Pattern and I have played around with various fabrics and features.

I sewed up size 6 for version 1 with the bodice lengthened to size 7. And I went for size 7 for the rest which I lengthened by two inches. I added an inch to both the bodice and skirt pieces.

Version 1

I went with a scoop neck and short sleeves for this version. I used cotton jersey fabric pieces which were leftover from previous projects. I did not have enough fabric for the flared skirt and I instead gathered the skirt. I used an elastic (braided) to gather the fabric which gave it more even gathers.

Love Notions Prisma dres
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Version 2

This version was her Christmas day dress and I wanted to make it more festive. I went with a scoop neck, elbow-length and flared skirt options. I used stretch velvet fabric for the bodice and gold sequined fabric for the skirt. The Gold sequined fabric is a woven fabric which I lined with gold satin fabric.

I was confident to use a woven fabric for the skirt because it has a dropped waist which does not need to fit over the body. This pattern allows for woven fabrics that match the stretch bodice fabric.

Version 3

This is a flared skirt version with elbow length and a boat neck. The boatneck option comes with buttons for easy access. I opted for plastic snaps for my version which are way easier than sewing buttonholes on jersey fabric. I also used a cotton jersey fabric in a ballerina print from Minerva.

Version 4

This was made out of an animal-print cotton jersey fabric I bought from Fabrics for all. I went with a flared skirt, elbow-length and a scoop neck. This version was the fastest to make because it was basic with no complicated options.

Conclusion

I love all the versions of the Prisma dress I have made and I know there are more to come. This pattern offers very many options to work with ranging from the pattern features to prints and types of fabric you choose. I hope you will give the Prisma pattern a go.

Thank you for stopping by. xx

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Compose Robe by Love Notions

Compose Robe by Love Notions

Everyone needs a robe in their wardrobes. I thought I should put it out there before I tell you all about the newly released sewing patterns by Love Notions. Love Notions has just released the Compose robe for ladies and /he Compose kids robe. Both these patterns are on release sale until 07/12/2020. The Compose robe can be sewed up for Christmas presents for both kids and the ladies in your lives. How timely is this pattern release!

I am both a pattern tester and an ambassador with Love Notions patterns. This means that any purchases you make using the Love Notions patterns links I share on here earns me a small commission which goes to support this website. However, this comes at no extra cost to you and you are under no obligation to use them.

Pattern Description

The compose pattern is drafted for both children and Ladies. Unfortunately, there is none for the men but I am so sure you can hack the pattern to sew up for them too.

Compose Pattern Line drawing

Features

  • Two lengths; knee and calf
  • Hood and band options
  • Optional patch pockets
  • Meant for both knit and woven fabrics.
  • Bonus compose hair wrap pdf pattern included

Pattern Sizing

Compose Kids robe comes in size 2T-16.

Compose robe (Ladies) and all sizes come with full bust pieces.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

The instructions are well-written and so easy to follow by a confident beginner.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

This pattern is recommended for both knit and woven fabrics ranging from light to heavyweight such as French Terry, Fleece, Waffle knit, Ponte, Double knits.

Fabrics Used

I made two Compose robes: a summery one in Viscose twill and a wintry version in cuddle fleece fabric.

Viscose Twill Fabric

I made a lightweight robe in a Camouflage Viscose twill fabric also known as rayon twill. I went with the collar version in this fabric however I skipped the pockets. This is mostly because the fabric easily slips and slides when working with it.

Bonus: the lightweight version can also double as a beach cover-up even better when made in a knee-length.

Cuddle Fleece fabric

My second version is the wintry version made out of an orange Cuddle Fleece fabric from Pounds Fabric, UK. This fabric is also known as Minky fabric. It was quite affordable considering I needed 3 metres for the project.

This version was made with the hood and the pockets. I am so happy with the final outcome, however, this fabric is not the easiest to sew up by any standards. This is because the pile on the fabric affects the way it feeds through the sewing machine.

Someone said to me that her sewing room looked like she had murdered a muppet from there after sewing up with Cuddle fleece fabric. Hahaha…

Tips on sewing with cuddle fleece fabric

These are my tried and tested tips which made the sewing process a bliss.

  • I used a walking foot which enables even feeding of both the top and the bottom fabrics.
  • Stretch / ball point needle size 90/14 is recommended and probably a brand new one.
  • Stitch length of 3.5 and above works best.
  • Lower presser foot tension of about 2.5 – 3 was perfect for me.
  • I also used long pins because they helped the hold the fabric together without shifting.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

There were no considerable changes made to the pattern apart from raising the belt loops because I have a short torso.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

I have both my children asking for new robes already. I know I will be sewing up some for the kids. I recommend this pattern to anyone who can use a sewing machine.

Conclusion

I love the two robes I have made and this is a pattern that every sewist needs These robes would also make the perfect Christmas presents.

Thank you for stopping by. xx

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Southbank Sweater by Nina Lee London

Southbank Sweater by Nina Lee London

The sweater season is upon us once again. Of course I didn’t just make a sweater but instead a sweater dress. This is the Southbank Sweater pattern by Nina Lee London. I sewed up it in the cosiest Fur back Ponte Roma fabric which was generously gifted to me by Minerva.

I thought I should bring this to your notice that Minerva has launched their new website this week. It is much more interactive and it also allows you to follower other sewists over there. Another exciting thing about the new website is the ability to purchase fabric off their site in increments less than a metre.

Pattern Description:  

The Southbank Sweater is a slightly oversized fit, funnel neck and drop-shoulders. This pattern comes in 3 versions: Version 1 is a sweater dress with a sweatshirt-inspired hem band and side-seam pockets, Version 2 is a hip-length top and Version 3 is a cropped sweater designed to finish at the natural waist. All three variations feature slouchy, slightly over-long sleeves with cuffs.

Nina Lee Southbank Sweater Sewing Pattern

Pattern Sizing:

This pattern comes in sizes 6-28 in PDF copy and sizes 6-20 for the printed one.

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?

Yes, it did.

Were the instructions easy to follow?

Yes, they were well written.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?

It is such an easy and quick sew.

Fabric Used:

Fur back Ponte Roma Knit Fabric from Minerva.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:

I lengthened the pattern by 2 inches.

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?

Yes, I hope to make a few more of the jumper dress. I would recommend this pattern to anyone even to a beginner.

Conclusion:

I love my jumper dress and it has had loads of wear already in the short time since I made it. If you would link to read in detail about how I got along with making this jumper dress, here is a detailed blog post over at the Minerva website.

Breckenridge Henley by Love Notions

Breckenridge Henley by Love Notions

Here is a brand new Henley pattern with no buttonholes. Yes, you heard right. Love Notions has just launched the Breckinridge Henley sewing pattern which is sure to be a favourite of many. I am honestly not a fan of buttonholes but I can’t always avoid them. However, my sewing machine and I hate sewing buttonholes on knit fabrics. I have already made two tops from the Breckinridge Henley pattern and I don’t think they will be my last. My final version is in pink in honour of Pink October for Breast Cancer Awareness.

Here is a pattern review video if you would rather watch instead of read.

I am both a pattern tester and an ambassador with Love Notions patterns. This means that any purchases you make using the Love Notions patterns links I share on here earns me a small commission which goes to support this website. However, this comes at no extra cost to you and you are under no obligation to use them.

The Pattern

Breckenridge Henley sewing Pattern

Pattern Features

  • Size range XS – 5X
  • All sizes come with Full bust pieces.
  • Three variations; Shirt, tunic and dress
  • Three sleeved options: short sleeves, Longs sleeves with cuff or roll-tabs.
  • A button placket without buttonholes.
  • Open Henley neckline

The Fabric

The Breckenridge Henley pattern is recommended for knit fabrics with at least 40% stretch. And these include rayon/viscose jersey, cotton jersey, ribbed jersey, waffle jersey and French terry. I sewed up two tops in two different fabrics and it was clear that the fabric chosen determines the overall fit if the top.

I made my first version out of a Striped cotton jersey fabric which was generously given to me by Fabrics for All. I am a blogger for Fabrics for All and I am given fabric in exchange for a review. The stripe pink and yellow fabric is the perfect fabric for pink October which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. This fabric also comes in other colourways which are still in stock online. I really enjoyed sewing up with it because it is quite stable and has a good weight to it.

My second version was made with two viscose jersey fabrics. The main fabric is a floral red which I picked up from a local fabric store a few years ago. And the grey viscose jersey I used to colour block was a scrap fabric I had in my stash.

The Making

I sewed up both my versions in size XS he sewing process these tops was straight forward. The one part in the process which would be a bit of a challenge is sewing the placket but the instructions come with a video tutorial which simplifies that part.

For the pink top, I sewed up the long-sleeved version with the tabs. The cotton jersey fabric gave me a more relaxed and almost boxy fit.

Alterations

  • I took in the top at the side seams for a more close fit.
  • I shortened the top by 1 inch mostly because I have a shorter torso compared to the rest of my body.

The red floral viscose jersey version was made with the short sleeves. The viscose fabric has more drape and fits better on the body. I did not find the need to take in this top because I was happy with the overall fit. This version was not shortened and it comes past my hips.

The finished projects

I am really happy with my final makes from this pattern. I am so sure these will not be my last. I hope to sew up the dress variation next with probably short sleeves. I hope you give this amazing pattern a go. You will not be disappointed. Thank you for stopping by. xx

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Sewing for Autumn and Winter With Love Notions Patterns

Sewing for Autumn and Winter With Love Notions Patterns

I am so sure we can all agree that this year, 2020, has gone by so fast. I do not need to get into details because we all probably have personal stories to tell. Where did the summer go? I do not remember enjoying wearing my me-made summer clothes out of my house much. And right now we need to start sewing for Autumn/Fall and Winter. And I would like to offer you some inspiration for your cold season wardrobe featuring Love Notions patterns.

Love Notions is currently running a 40% off site-wide birthday sale from Monday 5th October to Friday 9th October. This is also the last sale of the year. I hope you are inspired to pick up a few patterns before it ends.

I am both a pattern tester and an ambassador with Love Notions patterns. This means that any purchases you make using the Love Notions patterns links I share on here earns me a small commission which goes to support this website. However, this comes at no extra cost to you and you are under no obligation to use them.

Just in case you are wondering why Love Notions patterns? I have been a pattern tester with Love Notions for over 2 years. I have loved how the patterns are drafted and with the extra attention given in writing up the instructions. These patterns come in a wide size range not forgetting the full bust pieces included on all ladies’ patterns. These are PDF patterns so you should not expect them to come in the mail. The PDF patterns come in 3 versions: A4/ Letter size, AO size and a projector copy. This gives you instant gratification with many options to work with.

Love Notions patterns are drafted for ladies, gents and children. And many adults especially ladies’ pattern come with coordinating kids’ patterns. I would like to share with you patterns I have both sewed up or plan to sew up in groups.

Tops

  • La Bella Donna (Ladies) and Girls La Bella Donna – This pattern comes in both ladies and girls and can be throughout the year. It comes with various sleeve options. The long-sleeved and the cowl or hood options are perfect for the cold weather.
  • Terra Tunic – This is a straight fitting tunic which comes with 5 neck options and 4 sleeves lengths. The long-sleeved with wither a funnel neck or hoody is perfect for the cold weather in a cosy fabric.
  • Rockford raglan and Wrigley raglan – These are raglan tee patterns which feature various hem options and sleeve lengths. The Rockford is the ladies whereas the Wrigley is the girls’ version.

Bottoms

  • Glissando Pattern – This is the newest pattern which is exempted from the sale. It features shorts, cropped pants and a knee-length skirt. The cropped pants can be lengthened to make them suitable for the cold weather. And the skirt in a heavy-weight fabric would also be perfect when paired with tights and boots. This is exempted from the sale.
  • Resolution bottoms – This is such a versatile pattern which I plan to sew up really soon. It features 5 variations; plain leggings, moto leggings, bootcut yoga pants, straight cut yoga pants, and joggers. All these options are suitable for cold weather if made in cosy fabrics.
Glissando Cropped pants

Jumpers

  • Sloane sweater for ladies and Sloane sweater for girls – This is a pullover with various options. It can be made more fitted or with a relaxed fit. It also features any hem options. I have made to ladies’ Sloane sweaters which I hacked to be more fitted.
  • Constellation and Navigator Hoodie & Pullover – This is a great layering piece with a zipper option which can be made either as a hoodie or a pullover. I made both of these during pattern testing.

Cardigans / Sweater

Coat

  • Octave coat – This was the very first coat I ever made. It features a shawl collar, hood and a wide collar option has recently been added.
Octave Coat

Men and Boys

  • Dockside and Driftwood Henley & Polo: The Dockside is the men’s whereas the Driftwood is the kids. Both these patterns feature 3 variations: a crew neck tee, a polo and a Henley which when sewn with long – sleeves are perfect for the cold weather.
  • North Star and Navigator hoodie and pullover are similar to the ladies’ constellation jumper.
  • Samson Sweater: A boy’s shirt pattern which comes with two shirt hems and a hood option. It is a great winter wardrobe stable if made in cosy fabrics.
  • Vanguard Kit: This contains cargo joggers and a colour-block long sleeved it.

That is a round-up of my Autumn/fall and winter LoveNotions pattern recommendation. I hope you get round to sewing up some. Which of the patterns shared would you love to have a go at making?

Thank you for stopping by. xx

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